10. Coming Out: Part 1

Step 1: Coming Out to Friends As anyone who’s had to go through a coming out process about anything knows, it’s a long process. There are just so many people that have to be told. The difference between something like sexual orientation and gender identity, though, is that the latter requires more people’s knowledge. One 

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9. What’s My Legal Sex/Gender?

On Having Conflicting Identification Canadians have five principal legal documents that carry a sex/gender designation: birth certificate, social insurance number (SIN), passport, health card, and driver’s licence (DL). The rules for having one’s sex/gender designation changed is different from document to document, though some share the same rules. And the rules for some of the 

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8. Confronting Those who Misgender Me

Giving People a Yellow Card In Gender: An Ethnomethodological Approach (1985), Kessler and McKenna describe the act of “gendering” someone — or the process of gender attribution — as when a person, almost always subconsciously, attributes a gender to another person. Within seconds of meeting someone, we have usually already categorized them as “male” or 

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6. An Uncomfortable Teaching Situation

On Coming Out to My Classes For most trans persons, the transition process is neither quick nor sudden, although it may sometimes seem that way from the outside. By this I mean that by the time the person transitions to full time living as her or his new gender, s/he has taken many steps preparing 

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5. Being on Autopilot

Excuses for Using the Wrong Name or Pronouns, and My Ambivalence This post might make you feel bad, defensive, or angry, and for that I’m sorry. A gender transition typically involves a lot of changes. Now, not everyone changes their name. Some people were named with gender neutral names (this includes me, actually; although, the 

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